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18 September 2017: Academic Speed Dating Event

The idea behind this event, taking place in Newcastle, is to bring together members from other Newcastle and Durham departments to make 10 minute presentations about aspects of their research where a potential collaboration with Mathematicians or Computer Scientists might be beneficial. The audience comprises members of our Schools of Mathematical Sciences and colleagues from Computer Science. The format is ALL presentations followed by the opportunity for further informal discussions and refreshments.

Timetable:

Monday, 18 September

  • 14.00-15.15 (Lecture Theatre 2, Herschel Building): Presentations by
    • Benjamin Horrocks (Chemistry, Newcastle): Chemical Nanoscience
    • Ulrik Beierholm (Psychology, Durham): Using machine intelligence to understand human and animal intelligence
    • John Mangan (Marine Transport and Logistics, Newcastle): Maritime Logistics Patterns using AIS Data
    • Jim McElwaine (Earth Sciences, Durham): System identification for complex fluids
    • Ghaith Tarawne (Electrical and Electronic Eng., Newcastle): Challenges with Programming a Novel Million-Core Computer Architecture
  • 15.15-17.00 Informal Discussion, Coffee & Tea, Penthouse, Level 7, Herschel Building

Abstracts:

Ulrik Beierholm (Psychology, Durham): Using machine intelligence to understand human and animal intelligence

Humans, animals and robots have to deal with many layers of uncertainty when interacting with an environment (e.g. structural, perceptual or purely stochastic). We use ideas from computer science and statistics to build and test models of human and animal behaviour during a range of tasks.

Benjamin Horrocks (Chemistry, Newcastle): Chemical Nanoscience

The Chemical Nanoscience Laboratory works on the design, synthesis and investigation of novel nanomaterials. The talk will give an overview of some of the one-dimensional and two-dimensional materials that are of current interest in the lab. Our efforts to understand these materials lead to questions involving lattices, complex structures, random walks and image analysis where collaboration with mathematicians or computer scientists would be welcome.

John Mangan (Marine Transport and Logistics, Newcastle): Maritime Logistics Patterns using AIS Data

Marine transport is a “derived demand”, that is it’s contingent on the need to move goods from place to place. The Prime Maritime Transport group at Newcastle investigates various aspects of marine transport – my own interest is around containerised marine transport connectivity and global logistics. Containerisation has been a key enabler of global trade and further developments around digitisation and smart shipping, plus changes in manufacturing, are having a major influence on the sector. Within this context Automatic (Ship) Identification Systems (AIS) – which are now widely available and report information on vessel position, speed, type etc – provide a rich data source for various interesting analyses which hopefully we can use this session to explore.

Jim McElwaine (Earth Sciences, Durham): System identification for complex fluids

Direct simulations of granular material and other complex fluids can give complete information about a system. However, how to coarse-grain such data to produce continuum theories is extremely challenging. The key question is identifying the slow/normal manifold.

Ghaith Tarawne (Electrical and Electronic Eng., Newcastle): Challenges with Programming a Novel Million-Core Computer Architecture

Our group is developing software for a new massively parallel computer architecture involving up to a million cores (Project POETS, see \url{https://poets project.org/}). In this architecture, cores are laid out as a 2D mesh onto which computational problems can be mapped then solved/simulated by exchanging short messages. This new form of computation can overcome the scalability limitations of conventional shared-memory architectures (where all data exchanges take place in a centralised memory) but requires that algorithms and computational problems be re-formulated from the bottom up. I will briefly describe the architecture then summarise a few problems we’re attempting to tackle in this area.

Snapshots: